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  • Report: Herbicide spurs reproductive problems in many animals

    Both of these African clawed frogs are genetically male, but lifelong exposure to the herbicide atrazine transformed the frog on the bottom to female. The frog reproduced with normal males twice.

    Both of these African clawed frogs are genetically male, but lifelong exposure to the herbicide atrazine transformed the frog on the bottom to female. The frog reproduced with normal males twice.

    Photo by Tyrone Hayes

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      Both of these African clawed frogs are genetically male, but lifelong exposure to the herbicide atrazine transformed the frog on the bottom to female. The frog reproduced with normal males twice.

      Photo by Tyrone Hayes

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      University of Illinois professor emeritus of comparative biosciences Val Beasley and his colleagues reviewed the evidence linking atrazine exposure to reproductive problems in amphibians, fish, reptiles and mammals.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Researchers found many reproductive abnormalities, such as the presence of oocytes (eggs, in center of image) inside male frog testis.

      Micrograph courtesy Val Beasley Laboratory Group

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      University of California at Berkeley integrative biology professor and lead author Tyrone Hayes reported in 2010 that atrazine exposure in frogs was associated with genetic males becoming females and functioning as females.

      Photo by Gnoc Mai Nguyen

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