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  • Researcher tracks agricultural overuse of bug-killing technology

    These Bt corn plants in LaSalle County, Illinois, have fallen over (lodged) as a result of rootworm damage. Like other Bt plants that are becoming susceptible to rootworm damage in Iowa, these corn plants contain the Cry3Bb1 Bt protein in a field planted year after year in corn expressing the same Bt protein.

    These Bt corn plants in LaSalle County, Illinois, have fallen over (lodged) as a result of rootworm damage. Like other Bt plants that are becoming susceptible to rootworm damage in Iowa, these corn plants contain the Cry3Bb1 Bt protein in a field planted year after year in corn expressing the same Bt protein.

    Photo by Michael Gray

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      These Bt corn plants in LaSalle County, Illinois, have fallen over (lodged) as a result of rootworm damage. Like other Bt plants that are becoming susceptible to rootworm damage in Iowa, these corn plants contain the Cry3Bb1 Bt protein in a field planted year after year in corn expressing the same Bt protein.

      Photo by Michael Gray

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      University of Illinois crop sciences professor Michael Gray found exceedingly low numbers of corn and soybean insect pests in a survey of 47 counties in Illinois in 2011. Despite these low numbers, and historically low densities of European corn borers, growers tell Gray they will use Bt corn and pesticides again this year.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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