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  • Brain waves reveal video game aptitude

    University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Kyle Mathewson and his colleagues discovered that they could predict how quickly a person would learn a new video game by looking at the electroencephalogram of the person's brain at the start of play.

    University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Kyle Mathewson and his colleagues discovered that they could predict how quickly a person would learn a new video game by looking at the electroencephalogram of the person's brain at the start of play.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Kyle Mathewson and his colleagues discovered that they could predict how quickly a person would learn a new video game by looking at the electroencephalogram of the person's brain at the start of play.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Those whose brain waves oscillated most powerfully in the alpha spectrum (about 10 times per second) when measured at the front of the head (left EEG readout) tended to learn at a faster rate than those whose brain waves oscillated with less power (readout on the right), the researchers found.

      Photo courtesy Kyle Mathewson

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