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    High-frequency stock trading leads to an increase in order cancelation but little else of value to investors and the general public, says research co-written by University of Illinois business professor Mao Ye, left, and graduate students Chen Yao, center, and Jiading Gai.

    High-frequency stock trading leads to an increase in order cancelation but little else of value to investors and the general public, says research co-written by University of Illinois business professor Mao Ye, left, and graduate students Chen Yao, center, and Jiading Gai.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      High-frequency stock trading leads to an increase in order cancelation but little else of value to investors and the general public, says research co-written by University of Illinois business professor Mao Ye, left, and graduate students Chen Yao, center, and Jiading Gai.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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