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  • Study: Firms that purport to value shareholders pay CEOs more

    Using compensation data from 290 chief executives at large U.S. firms over an 11-year period, Taekjin Shin, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois, shows that firms that trumpet how much they value shareholders actually pay their CEOs more, regardless of the quality of their performance.

    Using compensation data from 290 chief executives at large U.S. firms over an 11-year period, Taekjin Shin, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois, shows that firms that trumpet how much they value shareholders actually pay their CEOs more, regardless of the quality of their performance.

    Photo courtesy School of Labor and Employment Relations

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      Using compensation data from 290 chief executives at large U.S. firms over an 11-year period, Taekjin Shin, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois, shows that firms that trumpet how much they value shareholders actually pay their CEOs more, regardless of the quality of their performance.

      Photo courtesy School of Labor and Employment Relations

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