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  • Sewage lagoons remove most - but not all - pharmaceuticals

    Rural sewage treatment lagoons remove most, but not all, of the pharmaceutical and personal care product and hormone contaminants from wastewater, suggests a new study led by Wei Zheng, a senior research scientist at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center and an adjunct faculty member in the department of natural resources and environmental sciences at Illinois.

    Rural sewage treatment lagoons remove most, but not all, of the pharmaceutical and personal care product and hormone contaminants from wastewater, suggests a new study led by Wei Zheng, a senior research scientist at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center and an adjunct faculty member in the department of natural resources and environmental sciences at Illinois.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Rural sewage treatment lagoons remove most, but not all, of the pharmaceutical and personal care product and hormone contaminants from wastewater, suggests a new study led by Wei Zheng, a senior research scientist at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center and an adjunct faculty member in the department of natural resources and environmental sciences at Illinois.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Wei Zheng and his team used a rural sewage treatment lagoon system to study these systems' effectiveness in removing pharmaceuticals and personal care products and hormones from wastewater.

      Photo by Wei Zheng

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      The researchers tested the water samples for the presence of 21 commonly used pharmaceuticals and personal care products and hormones, including caffeine and ibuprofen.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      The research team: Wei Zheng, an adjunct professor of natural resources and environmental sciences and a senior research scientist at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center, right; chemist Kelsey Wiles, center; and Yonghong Zou, a postdoctoral researcher.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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