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  • A bright idea: Tiny injectable LEDs help neuroscientists study the brain

    A thin plastic ribbon printed with advanced electronics is threaded through the eye of an ordinary sewing needle. The device, containing LEDs, electrodes and sensors, can be injected into the brain or other organs.

    A thin plastic ribbon printed with advanced electronics is threaded through the eye of an ordinary sewing needle. The device, containing LEDs, electrodes and sensors, can be injected into the brain or other organs.

    Photo courtesy John A. Rogers

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      A thin plastic ribbon printed with advanced electronics is threaded through the eye of an ordinary sewing needle. The device, containing LEDs, electrodes and sensors, can be injected into the brain or other organs.

      Photo courtesy John A. Rogers

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      VIEW VIDEO Ultra-miniaturized LEDs injected deep into the brain illuminate mysteries of neuroscience. The light triggers very targeted neurons, providing insight into structure, function, and complex connections within the brain.

      Photo courtesy John A. Rogers

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      John A. Rogers led the team of researchers at Illinois and Washington University in St. Louis that developed the tiny injectable LEDS that could have implications for treatment of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, depression, anxiety and other neurological disorders.

      Photo by Thompson-McClellan

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      A researcher holds ultra-miniaturized LEDs that can be injected deep into the brain to illuminate the mysteries of fundamental neuroscience.

      Photo courtesy John R. Rogers

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