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  • 3-D printing could lead to tiny medical implants, electronics, robots, more

    For the first time, a research team from Harvard University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated the ability to 3-D-print a battery. This image shows the interlaced stack of electrodes that were printed layer by layer to create the working anode and cathode of a microbattery.

    For the first time, a research team from Harvard University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated the ability to 3-D-print a battery. This image shows the interlaced stack of electrodes that were printed layer by layer to create the working anode and cathode of a microbattery.

    Photo by Jennifer Lewis

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      For the first time, a research team from Harvard University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated the ability to 3-D-print a battery. This image shows the interlaced stack of electrodes that were printed layer by layer to create the working anode and cathode of a microbattery.

      Photo by Jennifer Lewis

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      VIEW VIDEO To create the microbattery, a custom-built 3-D printer extrudes special inks through a nozzle narrower than a human hair. Those inks solidify to create the battery's anode (red) and cathode (purple), layer by layer. A case (green) then encloses the electrodes and the electrolyte solution added to create a working microbattery.

      Graphic by Jennifer Lewis

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  • To contact Jennifer Lewis, call 617-496-0233; email jalweis@seas.harvard.edu. To contact Shen Dillon, call 217-244-5622; email sdillon@illinois.edu.

    The paper, “3-D Printing of Interdigitated Li-Ion Microbattery Architectures,” is available online. This release was drafted by Dan Ferber, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University | dan.ferber@wyss.harvard.edu | 617-432-1547

    Other media contact: Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | Caroline Perry | cperry@seas.harvard.edu |
    617-496-1351