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  • Most flammable boreal forests in North America become more so

    The magenta-flowered fireweed, which springs up after a burn, dominates a landscape once covered in black spruce in Alaska's Yukon Flats.

    The magenta-flowered fireweed, which springs up after a burn, dominates a landscape once covered in black spruce in Alaska's Yukon Flats.

    Photo by Feng Sheng Hu

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      The magenta-flowered fireweed, which springs up after a burn, dominates a landscape once covered in black spruce in Alaska's Yukon Flats.

      Photo by Feng Sheng Hu

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      University of Illinois plant biology professor Feng Sheng Hu, right, and graduate students Melissa Chipman and Ryan Kelly report that fire frequency and severity in the Yukon Flats of Alaska are at their highest level in 10,000 years.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • To reach Feng Sheng Hu, call 217-244-2982; email fshu@life.illinois.edu. To reach Ryan Kelly, email rkelly@life.illinois.edu. The paper, “Recent Burning of Boreal Forests Exceeds Fire Regime Limits of the Past 10,000 Years,” is available online or from the U. of I. News Bureau.