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  • Capital gains tax 'locks in' investors, increases likelihood of opposition to fund management

    Mutual funds are more likely to oppose a firm's management when they are "locked-in" to a position that would otherwise trigger a capital gains tax for their investors, says research co-written by Scott Weisbenner, the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow in the College of Business.

    Mutual funds are more likely to oppose a firm's management when they are "locked-in" to a position that would otherwise trigger a capital gains tax for their investors, says research co-written by Scott Weisbenner, the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow in the College of Business.

    Photo courtesy College of Business

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      Mutual funds are more likely to oppose a firm's management when they are "locked-in" to a position that would otherwise trigger a capital gains tax for their investors, says research co-written by Scott Weisbenner, the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow in the College of Business.

      Photo courtesy College of Business

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  • To contact Scott Weisbenner, call 217-766-5012; email weisbenn@illinois.edu. The paper, "Locked-in to Govern: How the Capital Gain of a Stock Holding Affects a Mutual Fund's Voting Decision," is available online.