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  • Casualties get scant attention in wartime news, with little change since World War I

    Photo by
    L. Brian Stauffer

    The dead and wounded get little mention in wartime news coverage, whether it’s World War I or Iraq, says Scott Althaus, a professor of political science and of communication, pictured in front of columns honoring World War I dead at Illinois’ Memorial Stadium. Althaus led a study analyzing nearly 2,000 war-related stories that appeared in the New York Times over five major conflicts.


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  • To reach Scott Althaus, call 217-265-7845; email

    The paper, “Uplifting Manhood to Wonderful Heights? News Coverage of the Human Costs of Military Conflict From World War One to Gulf War Two,” is available online from Political Communication. at (access restricted) or as an unrestricted pdf. Co-authors are Nathaniel Swigger, professor of political science, Ohio State University; Svitlana Chernykh, postdoctoral research fellow, St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford; David J. Hendry, postdoctoral research associate, Center for the Study of American Politics, Yale University; Sergio C. Wals, professor of political science and in the Institute for Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska; and Christopher Tiwald, a U. of I. graduate student at the time of the research.