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Photos of the emerald ash borer and the damage it does

High resolution versions of these photos are available upon request.
Contact Diana Yates, Lif e Sciences Editor, 217-333-5802

Copyright photos by James E. Appleby, University of Illinois

 

emerald ash borer The adult tiger beetle is often seen on soil, gravel, stones, and logs, in sunny locations where it feeds on other insects

The emerald ash borer, left, is about one-half inch long. Under bright light it is dark green. It commonly is seen during mid-summer crawling on branches and trunks of ash trees. Its larvae bore into and under the bark, and tunnel in the underlying sapwood.

At a glance, the emerald ash borer may be confused with the tiger beetle, right, a bright green native beetle. The adult tiger beetle is often seen on soil, gravel, stones, and logs, in sunny locations where it feeds on other insects

A piece of ash firewood, left, with its bark removed, exposing serpentine larval galleries – the S-shaped tunnels dug by the larvae of the emerald ash borer larvae are seen in action boring tunnels under the bark of ash tree
A piece of ash firewood, left, with its bark removed, exposing serpentine larval galleries – the S-shaped tunnels dug by the larvae of the emerald ash borer.

At right, larvae are seen in action boring tunnels under the bark of ash tree.
extensive tunneling of the emerald ash borer larvae is readily visible the S-shaped tunneling is under way

Under the bark of a dead ash tree, left, extensive tunneling of the emerald ash borer larvae is readily visible.

At right, the S-shaped tunneling is under way.

two D-shaped holes, a definitive signature

 

 

 

Another tell-tale sign that emerald ash borers have infested a tree: new sprouts shooting off the base of a dying ash tree

On the trunk of the ash tree, left, are two D-shaped holes, a definitive signature
of the emerald ash borer.

At right, Another tell-tale sign that emerald ash borers have infested a tree: new sprouts shooting off the base of a dying ash tree.

 

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