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InsideIllinois

May 6, 2010 VOL. 29 No. 20
Mark Leonard
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L. Brian Stauffer

Survival mission Mark Leonard, the general manager of WILL, says that recent changes to the public broadcasting stations will enhance Illinois Public Media╒s mission, while working within the confines of state budget cuts.  Full story

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Scott Weisbenner

Study: Colleges suffer when endowment values wane

University investment decisions can deepen job losses and other financial cuts when market collapses carve into budget-supporting endowment funds, a new study by the National Bureau of Economic Research found.

Deepak Somaya

Exclusive licensing deals a tool for collaboration, study says

Exclusive licensing deals are a two-way safety net that fosters cooperation as new product ideas weave their way toward the marketplace, according to new research led by a UI business strategy expert.

Brendesha Tynes

Color-blind racial ideology linked to racism, both online and offline

mages from racial theme parties that are posted on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace not only elicit different reactions from different people based on their race and their attitudes toward diversity, they also represent an indirect way to express racist views about minorities, according to published research by a UI professor who studies the convergence of race and the Internet.

A research team led by electrical and computer engineering professor Gabriel Popescu used a novel measurement technique called diffraction phase microscopy to reveal the mechanics of red blood cells.

New microscopy technique reveals mechanics of blood cell membranes

Thanks to an interdisciplinary team of researchers, scientists now have a more complete understanding of one of the human body’s most vital structures: the red blood cell.

At the intersection of politics and nature, politics usually wins, even over the best intentions, says U. of I. political scientist Robert Pahre.

Politics often undermines even the best of environmental agreements

A caution to idealists inspired by Earth Day: At the intersection of politics and nature, politics usually wins, even over the best intentions, says political scientist Robert Pahre.

nstitute for Genomic Biology and entomology professor Gene Robinson and his colleagues found that the same genes guide different social behaviors in honey bees and paper wasps.

Paper wasps and honey bees share a genetic toolkit

They are both nest-building social insects, but paper wasps and honey bees organize their colonies in very different ways. In a new study, researchers report that despite their differences, these insects rely on the same network of genes to guide their social behavior.

Molecular and integrative biology professors Yang (Kevin) Xiang, Charles Cox and their colleagues found a potential new drug target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

Team finds promising new drug target for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the UI have identified a potential drug target for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: a receptor that is embedded in the membrane of neurons and other cells.

Campus »

Two more project team reports online

Two additional project team reports have been posted on the Stewarding Excellence @ Illinois website: the Institute of Aviation and IT@Illinois (information technology services).

The 139th commencement of the UI will be held in two ceremonies May 16 at Assembly Hall.

Commencement ceremonies to take place May 16 at Illinois

The 139th commencement of the UI will be held in two ceremonies May 16 at Assembly Hall.

Senate discusses future ‘financial challenges’

New research from the UI suggests that weight-loss campaigns that promote exercise may actually cause people to eat more.

dalores

Class demonstrates the rehabilitative powers of dance

Urbana resident Tauby Shimkin, 77, was able to walk without a cane for the first time in six years shortly after beginning a UI program aimed at helping people with disorders such as hers. Shimkin, who has lived with peripheral neuropathy for years, followed instructors seemingly without effort as she participated in the Dance for Parkinson’s class April 16.

dalores

Going Green: Volunteers needed May 22 for Prairie Plant Garden

Volunteers are encouraged to participate in the College of Veterinary Medicine’s second planting day on May 22 to complete the Prairie Plant Garden project.

Honors »

Twenty honored for excellence in teaching, advising

Ten faculty members, five academic professionals and five graduate teaching assistants at the UI were honored April 27 for excellence in teaching and advising.

University of Illinois professors Nigel Goldenfeld and Martin Gruebele are among 229 new members named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.University of Illinois professors Nigel Goldenfeld and Martin Gruebele are among 229 new members named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Two Illinois professors elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

UI professors Nigel Goldenfeld and Martin Gruebele are among 229 new members named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

dalores

Illinois professor elected to National Academy of Sciences

Nigel Goldenfeld has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences. Goldenfeld is the Swanlund Professor of Physics at the UI.

Education professor Brendesha Tynes has been awarded a $1.4 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study the effects of online racial discrimination.

Illinois professor receives four-year $1.4 million grant from NICHD

Brendesha Tynes, a professor of educational psychology and of African American studies at the UI, has been awarded a $1.4 million grant to study the effects of online racial discrimination. The grant is from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

UI historian Antoinette Burton wins Guggenheim Fellowship

A UI professor specializing in the history of the British Empire has won a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.

Book Corner »

Jacket illustration of “Faith in the Fight: Religion and the American Soldier in the Great War,” is William Balfour Ker's "Knights of Columbus," 1917, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, WWI Posters.

Role of religious faith in World War I examined in new book

Although World War I has faded from cultural memory, overshadowed by more dramatic and unambiguous conflicts that both preceded and followed it, the Great War continues to shape Americans’ interpretations of their nation, its war-craft and its soldiers today.

Part of the cover of a new book by Sharon Irish, a professor of library and information science and of architecture, that explores controversial artist Suzanne Lacy.

New book is first to focus on controversial artist Suzanne Lacy

The work of controversial artist Suzanne Lacy defies simple categorization. Sometimes described as performance art, feminist art or political art, it encompasses all those categories but fits neatly into none of them.