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Aug. 7, 2014 (Vol. 34, No. 3)
Railway safety was the theme of a whistle-stop tour held on the U. of I.’s Bardeen Quad, sponsored by CN Railroad in conjunction with the 2014 Global Level Crossing Safety and Trespass Prevention Symposium held Aug. 4 and 5 on the Urbana campus. Rides on the miniature trackless train, known as Obie, were given around the engineering quad as a way to increase awareness of safety issues related to railway crossings and railway property trespassing.
Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Training component
Railway safety was the theme of a whistle-stop tour held on the U. of I.’s Bardeen Quad, sponsored by CN Railroad in conjunction with the 2014 Global Level Crossing Safety and Trespass Prevention Symposium held Aug. 4 and 5 on the Urbana campus. Rides on the miniature trackless train, known as Obie, were given around the engineering quad as a way to increase awareness of safety issues related to railway crossings and railway property trespassing.

 

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Faculty, staff members mentor students through I-Promise

Many adults who mentor students in the Illinois Promise program often had “aha moments” during their youth, instances when a caring adult’s guidance or insight changed the course of their lives, said Susan Gershenfeld, the director of Illinois Promise Student Services.

Trustees approve appointments and construction projects

U. of I. trustees approved administrative appointments and construction projects July 24 during the board’s regular meeting at Student Center East on the UIC campus. 

SEC discusses process for proposed college of medicine

A detailed plan is being developed for the proposed new college of medicine on the Urbana campus and is expected to be presented soon to the Urbana-Champaign Senate for consideration.

Elabbas Benmamoun appointed as vice provosT

Associate Provost Elabbas Benmamoun is the new vice provost for faculty affairs and academic policies. His appointment is effective Aug. 16, pending approval by the U. of I. Board of Trustees.

Promotions, tenure announced

In July, the U. of I. Board of Trustees approved faculty promotions in academic rank and changes in tenure status. The changes will be effective at the beginning of the 2014-15 appointment year. Promotions granted for the Urbana campus: 40 promotions to professor without change in tenure, two to associate professor without change in tenure, and 43 to associate professor on indefinite tenure. In addition, three faculty members received tenure without change in rank. For a full listing (in PDF format), view the list compiled for the July U. of I. Board of Trustees meeting (link above).

HOME AWAY FROM HOME: MARK MITCHELL

It’s a little hard for a visitor to miss Mark Mitchell’s office in the U. of I. College of Veterinary Medicine’s Small Animal Clinic. Along a row of wooden doors framed on all sides by white-painted concrete blocks, his entryway is the one covered in brightly illustrated children’s drawings. There are paper spiders, crabs, turkeys and even a blue platypus.


FROM THE ARCHIVES: DRAMATIC ARTS

In this 1969 photograph, Kabuki theater actors strike a dramatic pose. The University Archives’ papers of Shozo Sato – who joined the U. of I. faculty as a visiting lecturer in 1965 and retired in 1992 as a professor of art – cover his career as an internationally renowned Japanese master of Zen arts and as a visionary theater director. (View the full series.)

Research »

Stem cells aid muscle repair and strengthening after resistance exercise

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.

Returning troops and their families have work to do after the reunion, researcher says

About 20,000 service members are headed home from Afghanistan before the end of this year. Thousands of others will be returning from other deployments. Many will arrive in the U.S. to happy reunions. But reunited couples and families will have work to do in the months that follow, says Leanne Knobloch, a University of Illinois communication professor who has studied the relationships of military families post-deployment for about five years – and is starting new research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense.

'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says

Buy the latest electronic gizmo du jour, or use that money to fix a leaky roof? Go out with friends, or stay home to catch-up on work to meet that looming deadline? And after you've finished that big project, do you treat yourself to a slice of chocolate cake or settle for a piece of fruit?

Study: NCAA eventually prevails in most student-athlete lawsuits

When student-athletes sue the NCAA, they win the initial round of litigation almost half of the time. But according to a new study from a University of Illinois expert in labor relations and collective bargaining in athletics, the NCAA eventually wins more than 70 percent of the time on appeal – a finding that could pressure both groups to adopt a new model for amateur athletics that more closely aligns itself with the employment relationship.

Cell mechanics may hold key to how cancer spreads and recurs

Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed, according to new findings from researchers at the University of Illinois.

Radio frequency ID tags on honey bees reveal hive dynamics

Scientists attached radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place.

Flash Index: Economy rebounding

The U. of I. Flash Index rose slightly in July to 106.2 from its 106.0 level in June. The index has remained in the 106.0 to 106.2 range for the past four months, indicating the Illinois economy continues to grow since the rate has stayed above 100, the dividing line between growth and decline.